Religion and the American Civil War

Cover of: Religion and the American Civil War |

Published by Oxford University Press in New York .

Written in English

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Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Religious aspects -- Congresses.

Edition Notes

Book details

Statementedited by Randall M. Miller, Harry S. Stout, Charles Reagan Wilson.
ContributionsMiller, Randall M., Stout, Harry S., Wilson, Charles Reagan.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE468.9 .R46 1998
The Physical Object
Paginationxiii, 422 p. ;
Number of Pages422
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL699724M
ISBN 100195121287, 0195121295
LC Control Number97047510

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" religion and the American Civil War are two topics that relate to one another in fascinating and revelatory ways. Religion and the American Civil War stands as a welcomed addition to the study of American religious history and to the study of the Civil War."/5(4).

The sixteen essays in this volume, all previously unpublished, address the little considered question of the role played by religion in the American Civil War. The authors show that religion, understood in its broadest context as a culture and community of faith, was found wherever the war was found/5.

Buy Religion and the American Civil War by Miller, Randall M., Stout, Harry S., Wilson, Charles Reagan (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low 5/5(3). If you can read only one book: George C. Rable, God's Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War.

Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of the North Carolina Press, Downloads: Religion in the Civil War Essay; Religion in the Civil War Resources. While God Is Marching on: The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers (Modern War Studies) by Steven E. Woodworth Paperback $ The Civil War as a Theological Crisis (The Steven and Janice Brose Lectures in the Civil War Era) by Mark A.

Noll Paperback $ Customers who viewed this item also viewed Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1Cited by: The sixteen essays in this volume, all previously unpublished, address the little considered question of the role played by religion in the American Civil War. The authors show that religion, understood in its broadest context as a culture and community of faith, was found wherever the war was found.

Comprising essays by such scholars as Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Drew Gilpin Faust, Mark Noll. Preface Introduction OVERVIEW 1. Religion and the American Civil War IDEAS 2.

The Bible and Slavery 3. Religion in the Collapse of the Union 4. Religion and the American Civil War is a fine addition to the field of religious history and fills a major void in the historiography of the Civil War. The editors succeeded in covering a massive topic in a logical and coherent manner.

The coterie of contributors provide a refreshing and solid analysis of religion and the American Civil War. Faith and Religion During the Civil War Drew Gilpin Faust’s book, This Republic of Suffering, explores the changing views of death during the Civil War. One chapter titled “Believing and Doubting” specifically discusses how soldiers and civilians either clung to or rejected religion to help them cope with widespread death and devastation.

The sixteen essays in this volume, all previously unpublished, address the little considered question of the role played by religion in the American Civil War. The authors Religion and the American Civil War book that religion, understood in its broadest context, as a culture and community of faith, was found wherever the war was found.

‎The sixteen essays in this volume, all previously unpublished, address the little considered question of the role played by religion in the American Civil War. The authors show that religion, understood in its broadest context as a culture and community of faith, was found wherever the war was found.

Religion and the American Civil War / Phillip Shaw Paludan --The Bible and slavery / Mark A. Noll --Religion in the collapse of the American union / Eugene D. Genovese --Church, honor, and secession / Bertram Wyatt-Brown --The coming of the Lord: the Northern Protestant clergy and the Civil War crisis / George M.

Fredrickson --"Wholesome. This book of splendid essays had its beginning in at a symposium on religion and the Civil War held at the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary.

The individual contributors did not agree on a single religious meaning of the conflict, but their various approaches at ferreting out the way individuals experienced the war in religious. The Routledge Sourcebook of Religion and the American Civil War collects these sources into a single convenient volume, the most comprehensive collection of primary source material on religion and the Civil War ever brought together.

The sixteen essays in this volume, all previously unpublished, address the little considered question of the role played by religion in the American Civil War. The authors show that religion, understood in its broadest context as a culture and community of faith, was found wherever the war Brand: Oxford University Press.

The religion and Civil War symposium in Louisville that led to the Religion and the American Civil War volume stands as a watershed event in terms of religion and Civil War historiography.

[2] However, a survey of Civil War historiography from the mids to the present provides the larger context in terms of recent historical attention. Religion and the American Civil War is a disturbing book. Its pages make abundantly clear that people of every political persuasion laid claim to God's word and turned to Scripture for proof and sustenance.

Religion lay at the heart of who Americans were even as they killed one another in unthinkable numbers. The Civil War Library and Museum " religion and the American Civil War are two topics that relate to one another in fascinating and revelatory ways.

Religion and the American Civil War stands as a welcomed addition to the study of American religious history and to the study of the Civil War." During the American Civil War, the Mennonites and Amish faced moral dilemmas that tested the very core of their faith.

How could they oppose both slavery and the war to end it. How could they remain outside the conflict without entering the American mainstream to secure legal conscientious objector status.

In the North, living this ethical paradox marked them as ambivalent. God's Almost Chosen Peoples: A Reli­gious History of the American Civil War, by George C. Rable. The most widely researched and best-balanced general book on religion and the Civil War, Rable's work is particularly impressive for what he reveals about the prominence of scripture, the prevalence of providential interpretations of the war's every aspect, the stimulus the war.

Religion played a major role in the American Revolution by offering a moral sanction for opposition to the British--an assurance to the average American that revolution was justified in the sight of God. As a recent scholar has observed, "by turning colonial resistance into a righteous cause, and by.

J. Matthew Gallman is a professor of history at the University of Florida. His most recent book, Defining Duty in the Civil War: Personal Choice, Popular Culture, and the Union Home Front (), won the Bobbie and John Nau Book Prize in American Civil War Era History.

Matthew C. Hulbert: 1. James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom (). Reagan Wilson, Baptized in Blood: The Religion of the Lost Cause, (Athens: The University of Georgia Press, ). For a finely woven analysis of the role of Civil War memory in our national consciousness, see David Blight's prize-winning, Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, ).

American civil religion is a sociological theory that a nonsectarian quasi-religious faith exists within the United States with sacred symbols drawn from national history.

Scholars have portrayed it as a cohesive force, a common set of values that foster social and cultural integration. The ritualistic elements of ceremonial deism found in American ceremonies and presidential invocations of.

Major revivals broke out in the Civil War armies. In the Union Army, betweenandsoldiers were converted; among Confederate forces, approximatelytroops converted to Christ. This book is intended for students and scholars of American religion and American history.\/span>\"@ en\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema:description\/a> \" Religion and the American Civil War \/ Phillip Shaw Paludan -- The Bible and slavery \/ Mark A.

Noll -- Religion in the collapse of the American union \/ Eugene D. Genovese -- Church, honor. Instead of American religion corrupting the Civil War with absolutism, it is more possible to say that the Civil War corrupted American religion.

An Iowa sergeant, shocked at Author: Allen Guelzo. Product Information. Both Prayed to the Same God is the first book-length, comprehensive study of religion in the Civil War. While much research has focused on religion in a specific context of the civil war, this book provides a needed overview of this vital yet largely forgotten subject of American History.

Religion in the Civil War has not been so much debated among historians as it has been ignored. Of the thousands of titles dealing with the Civil War, surprisingly few address the significant role that religion played in framing the issues of the conflict.

Fortunately, this neglect has begun to recede. To set the scene for our discussion of books about the American Civil War, please tell me about your book, This Republic of Suffering, which illuminates the toll of the war.

The American Civil War was fought, from throughover sectional issues between North and South, including questions of slavery and the power of the central government to enforce its will within the United States.

National days of pray are common and the churches support the cause and war to the bitter end. Most of have never been involved in a nation fight for survival, this book looks at the role of religion in this type of war.

I have read several books on religion during the Civil War. This is without a doubt the most comprehensive. The Soldier's Prayer Book Arranged from the Book of Common Prayer; With Additional Collects and Hymns.

Hospital ed. Philadelphia: Protestant Episcopal Book Society, ca. Also see The Monthly Journal of the American Unitarian Association, v. 2, no. 10 (Oct. ), p.an issue entitled "The Soldier's Companion.".

Integrating the most recent Civil War scholarship with little-known primary sources and new information from Pennsylvania and Virginia to Illinois and Iowa, Lehman and Nolt provide the definitive account of the Anabaptist experience during the bloodiest war in American history.

In Religion and the American Civil War, ed. Randall M. Miller, New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, Rable, George C. God's Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War. University of North Carolina Press, The Civil War And The Harvest Of Death Most books on the American Civil War can be grouped into one of two categories.

The first category consists of studies of the military history of the conflict, frequently focusing on individual battles or campaigns.4/5(). Notes. John Hope Franklin, Reconstruction after the Civil War, 2d ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, ), George C. Rable, God’s Almost Chosen People: A Religious History of the American Civil War (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, ); James M.

McPherson, afterword to Religion and the American Civil War, ed. Randall M. Miller, Harry S. Stout. The greatest culture war in American history led to its most destructive war.

Or so argued James Davison Hunter in Before the Shooting Begins, the follow-up to his provocative and influential book Culture Wars (). “Culture wars always precede shooting wars,” he wrote, “otherwise, as Philip Rieff reminds us, the latter wars are utter madness: outbreaks of the most severe and.

The Lost Cause of the Confederacy, or simply the Lost Cause, is an American pseudo-historical, negationist ideology that advocates the belief that the cause of the Confederate States during the American Civil War was a just and heroic one.

This ideology has furthered the belief that slavery was just and moral, because it brought economic notion was used to perpetuate racism and. Perman, Michael [Martin Ryerson Reports How Workers Are Reacting to the Draft, July ] Major Problems in the Civil War and Reconstruction Houghton Mifflin () p Rable, George C.

God’s Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, The Civil War era affected the American religious life in important ways.

What some scholars consider a third Great Awakening began in the s and continued during the war itself. Indeed, the conflict looked much more like an evangelical Protestant war than had the Revolution, the War ofor the Mexican War. For example “Religion and the American Civil War” is a collection of essays and poems by various writers (Harry S.

Stout, George Reagan Wilson, etc.1) A survey of the civil war history from around to the present provides a very extensive context in terms of historical attention to the civil war and religion.Civil religion involves beliefs (but no formal creed), events that seem to reveal God's purposes (most notably the American Revolution and the Civil War), prophets (especially Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln), sacred places (shrines to Washington, Lincoln, and Franklin Roosevelt; Bunker Hill; and Gettysburg), sacred texts (the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and Lincoln’s.The War Between the States, also known as the American Civil War, is often described as a war fueled by disagreement between the North and the South over States’ rights and slavery.

However, religious factors also influenced the positions taken by both sides in the conflict.

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